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An Appeal for Reconciliation

2 Corinthians 6:1-13; 7:1-4                                                                 Sunday, August 24, 2014

 

 

http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?&id=HN.608041419459006179&w=300&h=300&c=0&pid=1.9&rs=0&p=0

Lesson Aims:

  • To promote the reading and understanding of

            God’s Word (Nehemiah 8:8);

  • To demonstrate how Paul and the other  

            disciples lived a life of holiness; to compare

            Paul’s claim for a holy lifestyle with our

            current behavior;

  • To evaluate our willingness to endure

             hardship for the sake of Christ.

 

 

 

 

  1. Devotional Reading:  2 Corinthians 5:16-21.  List three insights that you gained from studying this passage.  

     

     

Memory Verse: 2 Corinthians 7:2       Receive us; we have wronged no man, we have corrupted no man, we have defrauded no man.

 

 

 

  1.  

    http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=HN.608040173751634508&w=221&h=172&c=7&rs=1&pe=1&mo=10_30&pid=1.7

     

    on 2 Corinthians. The Church at Corinth. 2 Corinthians

Paul is the author of this letter (1:1; 10:1). It is the apostle’s most personal and pastoral letter. While it is a different kind of letter than Romans or even 1 Corinthians, it is characterized by his style. It contains more autobiographical material than any of his other writings.

The letter is difficult to date, for we do not know the amount of time that separated 1 and 2 Corinthians. It has been variously dated between a.d. 55 and 57.

Purpose and Theology. The primary purpose of 2 Corinthians was to prepare the church at Corinth for another visit from Paul. The letter was penned at a difficult time between Paul and the Corinthians. Paul communicated his thankful relief that the crisis at Corinth had somewhat subsided. Moreover, Paul wrote to them concerning the collection that he wanted to gather for the church at Jerusalem.

Paul exercised extraordinary vigor in declaring his role and authority as an apostle. His opponents, the so-called “super apostles” (see 2 Cor. 10–13), had challenged Paul’s apostolic status and leadership. In return Paul authenticated his apostolic calling and ministry.

The self-portrait of Paul is one of the most fascinating features of this letter. Second Corinthians gives invaluable autobiographical information. Dominant motifs include Paul’s gratitude to God and Christ (1:3; 5:14) and his ministry as a continuing triumph in Christ (2:14). Paul shared the risen life of Christ (4:10–11). Simultaneously he gloried in infirmities and was content with weaknesses, persecutions, and calamities for the sake of Christ (12:9). His ministry was characterized by integrity and suffering (1:8–12; 6:3–10; 11:23–29), marks of a true apostle. His message as an ambassador of Christ focused on the message of reconciliation (5:11–21) and Jesus Christ as Lord (4:5).

Paul’s collection for the church at Jerusalem had an important role in his missionary efforts. He devoted two chapters to this matter (chaps. 8–9). They provide some of the most helpful teaching on Christian stewardship found in the New Testament.[1]

 

 

 

III.             THOUGHTS TO CONSIDER:         

 

2 Corinthians 6:1-13:

 

1 We then, as workers together with him, beseech you also that ye receive not the grace of God in vain.

 

  • Workers together: (συνεργοῦντες   synergountes     Present Active Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = collaborating together on a common enterprise or project.

  • Beseech: (παρακαλοῦμεν   parakaloumen     Present Active Indicative 1st Person Plural) = entreat, ask for, or request earnestly.

  • In vain: (κενὸν   kenon) = for no reason; to no end.

  • Grace: (χάριν   charin) = the resulting activity that is a necessary consequence of genuine, beneficent goodwill, especially used of the accomplishing of God’s goodwill.

  • God: (Θεοῦ   Theou) = the Creator, Sustainer, and Ruler of all that exists.

  • Receive: (δέξασθαι   dexasthai     Aorist Infinitive Deponent) = to get something; to come into the possession of something.

Questions:

  • Why is it important that we work together with God?

  • Make observations about not receiving the grace of God in vain.

  • Cite evidence of believers encouraging one another to have greater confidence in God and to be bolder in living out their faith. What was the outcome of this encouragement?

  • Prove that God’s grace and mercy are expressed through God’s covenant with His chosen people.

  • After reading 2 Chronicles 32:6-7, explain how King Hezekiah encouraged his people.

 

 

(For he saith, I have heard thee in a time accepted, and in the day of salvation have I succoured thee: behold, now is the accepted time; behold, now is the day of salvation.)

 

  • He saith: (λέγει   legei     Present Active Indicative 3rd Person Singular) = he has a certain wording or form; he expresses in words.

  • Time: (καιρός   kairos) = the occasion of a particular event; kairos is viewed as an occasion, rather than as an extent.

  • Accepted: (δεκτῷ   dekto) = occurring at a convenient or suitable time.

  • I have heard: (ἐπήκουσά   epekousa     Aorist Active Indicative 1st Person Singular) = I have listened or I have heeded with intention.

  • Day: (ἡμέρᾳ   hemera) = a time assigned to a particular purpose or observance.

  • Salvation: (σωτηρίας   soterias) = deliverance; recovery or preservation from loss or danger, whether physical or spiritual.

  • Have I succoured: (ἐβοήθησά   eboethesa     Aorist Active Indicative 1st Person Singular) = have I given help or assistance; have I been of service.

  • Now: (νῦν   nun) = at the present moment.

  • Accepted: (εὐπρόσδεκτος   euprosdektos) = very favorable; occurring at an especially or particularly convenient or suitable time.

 

Questions:

  • Tell how God has specifically heard your prayers.

  • Make observations to your group about your day of salvation.

  • Explain how God came to your help when you needed Him the most.

  • Critique God’s response to your prayer requests during a very challenging period in your life. What did you conclude?

  • Why do human beings need to be saved?

  • Identify patterns in your old life that indicated your need for salvation.

  • Compare your new life in Christ with your old patterns of behavior. What did you conclude?

  • Connect death and decay with the consequence of sin. What is the remedy for death and decay?

 

 

Giving no offence in any thing, that the ministry be not blamed:

 

  • Giving: (διδόντες   didontes     Present Active Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = causing a new state in something.

  • Offence: (προσκοπήν   proskopen) = stumbling; a cause of an accidental misstep which threatens (or actually results in) a fall.

  • Be not blamed: (μωμηθῇ   momethe     Aorist Passive Subjunctive 3rd Person Singular) = be criticized; be or become attributed with blame or criticism (whether real or perceived).

  • Ministry: (διακονία   diakonia) = a role done, especially in service to others.

 

Questions:

  • Although we remain imperfect in this life, why are we considered as blameless before God?

  • Show how the Gospel is seen as offensive by unbelievers.

  • Draw conclusions about those who oppose God’s work, and cite evidence for your line of thinking.

  • Design and discuss a pattern of behavior that would give no offence to the ministry.

  • When should our Christian conduct be blameless?

 

 

But in all things approving ourselves as the ministers of God, in much patience, in afflictions, in necessities, in distresses,

 

  • Approving: (συνιστῶντες   sunistontes     Present Active 1st Person Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = recommending or presenting as worthy of regard, kindness, or confidence.

  • Ministers: (διάκονοι   diakonoi) – servant; someone who waits on or attends to the needs of another.

  • Patience: (ὑπομονῇ   hypomone) = steadfast endurance; the power to withstand hardship or stress, especially the inward fortitude necessary.

  • Afflictions: (θλίψεσιν   thlipsesin) = an oppressive state of physical, mental, social, or economic adversity.

  • Necessities: (ἀνάγκαις   anankais) = a distressing state, especially one that arises out of matters of necessity.

  • Distresses: (στενοχωρίαις   stenochoriais) = trouble of an oppressive and constricting nature.  

 

Questions:

  • Discuss your call to the ministry, and compare it to the call of Isaiah (Chapter 6), Jeremiah (Chapter 1), or Paul (Acts 9, 22, or 26). What did you conclude?

  • How do you know that you are a minster of God?

  • Why is servanthood an integral aspect of our relationship with God?

  • Discuss your “secret” for being able to withstand hardship or stress.

  • When do you exhaust your patience?

  • What do you do when you don’t know what to do?

  • Relate how God has proven Himself to His promises, thereby encouraging you to trust Him even more than you did previously.

  • Cite evidence of Scripture commending those who are faithful to God.

 

 

In stripes, in imprisonments, in tumults, in labours, in watchings, in fastings;

 

  • Stripes: (πληγαῖς   plegais) = a powerful stroke with a fist or with a weapon.

  • Imprisonments: (φυλακαῖς   phylakais) = a place for the detention or processing of criminals or the accused.

  • Tumults: (ἀκαταστασίαις   akatastasiais) = upheaval; a state of violent group disturbance and disorder, especially as in politics or social conditions generally.

  • Labours: (κόποις   kopois) = hard, difficult, and strenuous work.

  • Watchings: (ἀγρυπνίαις   agrypniais) = sleeplessness; a temporary state in which one is unable to sleep.

  • Fastings: (νηστείαις   nesteiais) = hunger; a physiological need for food, whether regular or the result of deprivation.

 

Questions:

  • How have you responded to negative experiences in your life? See 1 Peter 3:16-17.

  • Summarize how the sufferings listed in this verse five contributed to the growth and development of the early Christians.

  • Explain why so many Christians have suffered and do suffer because of the actions of other human beings.

  • If members of the Early Church suffered as mentioned in this verse five, why does much of the preaching in this epoch project material gain, success, affluence, and similar outcomes?

  • List current examples of oppression, and make observations as to how God feels about each one.

  • Explain how God gives reassurance to those who experience discouragement.

 

 

By pureness, by knowledge, by long suffering, by kindness, by the Holy Ghost, by love unfeigned,

 

  • Pureness: (ἁγνότητι   hagnoteti) = the state of being unsullied by sin or moral wrong, especially lacking a firsthand knowledge of evil.

  • Knowledge: (γνώσει   gnosei) = the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned.

  • Longsuffering: (μακροθυμίᾳ   makrothymia) = patient endurance of pain or unhappiness.

  • Kindness: (χρηστότητι   chrestoteti) = the quality of being warmhearted, considerate, humane, gentle, and sympathetic.

  • Holy Ghost: (Πνεύματι   Ἁγίῳ   Pneumati Hagio) = God’s being as controlling influence, as that which differentiates God from everything that is not God, as the divine power that produces all divine existence, as the divine element in which all divine life is carried on, as the bearer of every application of the divine will. All those who belong to God possess or receive this Spirit and hence have a share in God’s life;[2] the third person of the triune God, the Holy Spirit, coequal, coeternal with the Father and the Son.

  • Love: (ἀγάπῃ   agape) = a strong, non-sexual affection and regard for persons and their good as understood by God’s moral character, especially characterized by a willing forfeiture of rights or privileges in another person’s behalf.

  • Unfeigned: (ἀνυποκρίτῳ   anypokrito) = unhypocritical; not pretended; sincerely felt or expressed.

 

Questions:

  • Describe your approach to and your attitude toward suffering.

  • Explain the role of the Holy Ghost (Holy Spirit) in the life of the Christian.

  • Give examples of your having given up rights or privileges for another individual. Why did you do it?

  • Explain why our heartfelt concern and steadfast practical care show the Holy Spirit’s working in our life.  

  • Discuss the fruit of the Spirit and how He is moving in your life.  See Galatians 5:22-23.

  • Are you walking in the Spirit? Discuss.

 

By the word of truth, by the power of God, by the armour of righteousness on the right hand and on the left,

 

  • Word: (λόγῳ   logo) = a message; a communication that is most often spoken, but can come through other means.

  • Truth: (ἀληθείας   aletheias) = conformity to reality or actuality, often with the implication of dependability.

  • Power: (δυνάμει   dynamei) = possession of controlling influence, often understood as manifesting influence over reality in a supernatural manner.

  • Armour: (ὅπλων   hoplon) = weapon; any instrument or instrumentality used in hunting or fighting, especially used in warfare.

  • Righteousness: (δικαιοσύνης   dikaiosynes) = a status of legal rectitude (morality, integrity, uprightness) that satisfies the moral requirements of God’s character.

  • Right hand: (δεξιῶν   dexion) = on the side of the body that is east when you face north.

  • Left: (ἀριστερῶν   aristeron) = the side to the north when a person or object faces east.

Questions:

  • How do the truth, the power of God, and the armour of righteousness present the disciples as worthy of regard, kindness, or confidence?

  • Make observations as to how a person’s lifestyle can affect how others receive the Gospel. Share your conclusions with your group.

  • Compare the weapons used by nonbelievers with those used by Christians. Share your observations with your group. See 2 Corinthians 10:3-5.

  • Analyze the behaviors and the impact of those who continually walk in the truth. Share your conclusions with your group.

  • Why should the way that we speak reflect our calling as Christians?

  • Identify patterns of godly and ungodly speech. Does your speech commend or condemn your Christian lifestyle? Discuss.

  • Analyze behaviors (conduct, actions, deeds, activities, manners) that reflect the power of God in the life of the believer.

 

 

By honour and dishonour, by evil report and good report: as deceivers, and yet true;

 

  • Honour: (δόξης   doxes) = a positive acknowledgment, recognition, or esteem of someone’s character, nature, or attributes.

  • Dishonour: (ἀτιμίας   atimias) = a state of shame or disgrace.

  • Evil report: (δυσφημίας   dysphemias) = slander; abusive words falsely spoken that damage a person’s reputation.

  • Good report: (εὐφημίας   euphemias) = the state of being held in high esteem and honor.

  • Deceivers: (πλάνοι   planoi) = marked by deliberate deceptiveness.

  • True: (ἀληθεῖς   aletheis) = righteous, honest, real, or genuine; not imaginary; not false.

 

Questions:

  • Identify the attributes or qualities that would present the disciples as worthy of regard, kindness, or confidence. In other words, how and what should a Christian look like and be like?

  • Why should we avoid self-commendation? See Proverbs 27:2.

  • Make observations as to how certain behaviors can bring shame to the Christian community.

  • Explain how slander or abusive words can damage a person’s reputation.

  • Why do Christians sometimes suffer reproach (criticism, censure, reprimand, blame)?

  • Critique the most recent conversation in which you were involved. Did this conversation glorify God? Discuss.

  • What causes one person to deceive another?

  • List and summarize the liberating qualities of the truth.

  • Compare the telling of the true with the telling of lies. What are the similarities, and what are the differences?

 

As unknown, and yet well known; as dying, and, behold, we live; as chastened, and not killed;

 

  • Unknown: (ἀγνοούμενοι   agnooumenoi      Present Passive 1st Person Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = disregarded; characterized by not being acknowledged.

  • Well known: (ἐπιγινωσκόμενοι   epiginoskomenoi    Present Passive 1st Person Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = being discerned clearly and distinctly, or as true and valid.

  • Dying: (ἀποθνήσκοντες   apothneskontes    Present Active 1st Person Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = passing from physical life and losing all bodily attributes and functions necessary to sustain life.

  • Behold: (ἰδοὺ   idou) = Lo! Look! See!

  • We live: (ζῶμεν   zomen     Present Active Indicative 1st Person Plural) = we are animate, conscious, breathing, or aware.

  • Chastened: (παιδευόμενοι   paideuomenoi     Present Passive 1st Person Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = being disciplined; being or becoming subjected to a penalty (as pain, shame, restraint, or loss) for an offense in order to induce some behavior.

  • Not killed: (μὴ θανατούμενοι   me thanatoumenoi     negative + Present Passive 1st Person Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = not being executed or put to death.

 

Questions:

  • Why does God chasten His children? See Hebrews 12:5-11.

  • How do you deal with the sorrow or despondency caused by your suffering or misfortune?

  • Summarize how the righteous man Job dealt with his personal loss and suffering.

  • Share with your group how “thinking of the goodness of Jesus” can bring us through our various temptations and trials.

  • How does your faith community support missionaries and others who are working in our Lord’s vineyard?

 

 

10 As sorrowful, yet alway rejoicing; as poor, yet making many rich; as having nothing, and yet possessing all things.

 

  • Sorrowful: (λυπούμενοι   lypoumenoi     Present Passive 1st Person Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = being sad, distressed, grieved, or unhappy.

  • Alway: (ἀεὶ   aei) = at all times; all the time and on every occasion.

  • Rejoicing: (χαίροντες   chairontes     Present Active 1st Person Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = feeling happiness; being glad.

  • Poor: (πτωχοὶ   ptochoi) = having little money or possessing little of something.

  • Many: (πολλοὺς   pollous) = multitude, throng, or large gathering of people.

  • Making rich: (πλουτίζοντες   ploutizontes     Present Active 1st Person Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = causing someone to become very wealthy in resources (whether figurative or literal).

  • Nothing: (μηδὲν   meden) = a quantity of no importance.

  • Having: (ἔχοντες   echontes     Present Active 1st Person Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = possessing, either in a concrete or an abstract sense.

  • Possessing: (κατέχοντες   katechontes     Present Active 1st Person Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = having ownership or possession of something, including future endowments by claim of right.

 

Questions:

  • Why can believers see themselves as “being blessed” in spite of their current circumstances?

  • Show how sharing the Gospel can cause others to become rich.

  • Explain why poverty exists throughout the world.

  • Analyze the acts of courage of different individuals. What did you observe?

  • When, where, and how does discouragement occur in the life of the believer?

  • Explain how some people are able to rejoice in tribulation.

 

 

11 O ye Corinthians, our mouth is open unto you, our heart is enlarged.

 

  • Mouth: (στόμα   stoma) = the opening through which food is taken in and vocalizations emerge.

  • Is open: (ἀνέῳγε   aneoge     Perfect Active Indicative 3rd Person Singular) = ajar; not closed; sincere, frank, candid, or unguarded.

  • O Corinthians: (Κορίνθιοι   Korinthioi) = inhabitants of Corinth, an ancient Greek city about 80 kilometers / 50 miles west of Athens.

  • Heart: (καρδία   kardia) = the locus of a person’s thoughts (mind), volition, emotions, and knowledge of right from wrong (conscience).

  • Is enlarged: (πεπλάτυνται   peplatyntai     Perfect Passive Indicative 3rd Person Singular) = is made wide; has become great in extent from one side to the other.

 

Questions:

  • How does a new heart reflect the grace of God in the life of the believer?

  • What does having a new heart tell us about the teaching of holiness and sanctification?

  • Identify behaviors that can cause our heart to fall away from God.

  • Explain why emotions and sentiments are important to the life of faith.

 

 

 

 

 

12 Ye are not straitened in us, but ye are straitened in your own bowels.

 

  • Ye are not straightened: (οὐ στενοχωρεῖσθε   ou stenochoreisthe     Present Passive Indicative 2nd Person Plural) = you are not emotionally cool; you are not become unfriendly and uncaring towards, conceived of as a psychological faculty (like the heart) being narrow.

  • Bowels: (σπλάγχνοις   splanchnois) = a deeply felt compassion.

 

Questions:

  • Explain how situations in your life have brought you closer to God.

  • How do you know that you are making spiritual progress?

  • To what or to whom do you need to open your heart?

  • Explain why a renewed heart causes us to live a holy life?

  • Why can our emotions cause us to become open or closed to the experiences of life?

 

 

13 Now for a recompence in the same, (I speak as unto my children,) be ye also enlarged.

 

  • Recompence: (ἀντιμισθίαν   antimisthian) = reward or exchange;

  • Children: (τέκνοις   teknois) = preteenagers; preadolescent; young people; prepubescent.

 

Questions:

  • What does it take for you to open up your heart to God and to the people of God?

  • Discuss the benefits of opening up of our hearts to God and to His servants.

  • Discuss the characteristics of a yielded heart.

  • Cite examples of transparency leading to spiritual growth.

 

 

2 Corinthians 7:1-4:

 

1 Having therefore these promises, dearly beloved, let us cleanse ourselves from all filthiness of the flesh and spirit, perfecting holiness in the fear of God.

 

  • Promises: (ἐπαγγελίας   epangelias) = a verbal commitment by one person to another agreeing to do (or not to do) something in the future.

  • Dearly beloved: (ἀγαπητοί   agapetoi) = cherished, prized, or valued.

  • Let us cleanse: (καθαρίσωμεν   katharisomen     Aorist Active Subjunctive 1st Person Plural) = let us prune, clear, cut away, purge, or heal.

  • Filthiness: (μολυσμοῦ   molusmou) = action by which something becomes dirty or sullied.

  • Flesh: (σαρκὸς   sarkos) = sinful humanity; the physical aspect of a person in distinction to the immaterial soul, often understood as the seat of sin and rebellion to God.

  • Spirit: (πνεύματος   pneumatos) = the soul understood especially according to its composition: being made of a transcendental, immaterial existence known as spirit.

  • Perfecting: (ἐπιτελοῦντες   epitelountes     Present Active 1st Person Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = completing; bringing to a whole, with all the necessary parts or elements.

  • Holiness: (ἁγιωσύνην   hagiosynen) = the quality of being personally dedicated to God, either by being set apart, by being morally pure, or by being devoted to God.

  • Fear: (φόβῳ   phobo) = reverence; a feeling of profound respect for someone or something, often a deity, conceived of as fear.

 

Questions:

  • How do you know that you are valued in the eyes of God?

  • After reading 2 Corinthians 6:14-18, list the promises that God makes to His people.

  • Assess why you want a closer relationship with God.

  • Show how relying on the promises of God has increased your faith in Him and caused you to experience spiritual growth.

  • Design a plan that shows how a person can become spiritually clean.

  • What things do you need to prune from your life?

  • Discuss why we should choose our friends carefully.

  • After considering the above definition of holiness, discuss how and why you are living a holy and a separated life.

  • Critique how our fear (reverence) of God has changed over the last ten, twenty, thirty, forty, or even fifty years.

  • Why does God call us to holiness?

  • How does your life reflect the holy character of God?

 

 

Receive us; we have wronged no man, we have corrupted no man, we have defrauded no man.

 

  • Receive: (Χωρήσατε   choresate     Aorist Active Imperative 2nd Person Plural) = warm up emotionally to another; make room in one’s heart; become more friendly or caring towards, conceived of as making habitable space for someone in one’s heart.

  • No man: (οὐδένα   oudena) = no one.

  • We have wronged: (ἠδικήσαμεν   edikesamen   Aorist Active Indicative 1st Person Plural) = treated unjustly, injured, or done harm to.

  • We have corrupted: (ἐφθείραμεν   ephtheiramen     Aorist Active Indicative 1st Person Plural) = perverted morally as by intemperance or sensuality.

  • We have defrauded: (ἐπλεονεκτήσαμεν   epleonektesamen     Aorist Active Indicative 1st Person Plural) = exploited, used, or manipulated to one’s advantage.

 

 

 

Questions:

  • What causes one group of people to become emotionally cool or distant to another group?

  • After reading 1 Corinthians 6:9, apply its meaning to what is currently happening as you minister to others.

  • Explain why Paul repeats the term, no one, three times in this verse two.

  • Why does commandment number ten tell us not to covet?

  • Why does 1 Corinthians 12:31 tell us to covet?

  • What are some of the consequences of coveting?

  • Compare 1 Samuel 12:3-5 with this verse two, listing the differences as well as the similarities.

 

 

I speak not this to condemn you: for I have said before, that ye are in our hearts to die and live with you.

 

  • Condemn: (κατάκρισιν   katakrisin) = the act of pronouncing someone guilty in a criminal court.

  • I have said before: (προείρηκα   proeireka     Perfect Active Indicative 1st Person Singular) = mentioned formerly; made reference to something in an earlier time.

  • Ye are: (ἐστε   este     Present Active Indicative 2nd Person Plural) = have the quality of being.

  • Die: (συναποθανεῖν   synapothanein     Aorist Active Infinitive) = perish together with another or others.

  • Live with: (συζῆν   syzen     Present Active Infinitive) = pass one’s life together with another or others.

 

Questions:

  • Show how the grace of God is alive in Paul’s heart and in yours.

  • What kinds of sacrifices are you willing to make for others?

  • List and discuss examples of Biblical and personal love. What did you observe?

  • How does our love for God’s word reflect our inner being?

 

 

Great is my boldness of speech toward you, great is my glorying of you: I am filled with comfort, I am exceeding joyful in all our tribulation.

 

  • Great: (πολλή   polle) = remarkable or out of the ordinary in degree, magnitude, or effect.

  • Boldness: (παρρησία   parresia) = the trait of being willing to undertake activities that involve risk or danger, especially that involve being honest and straightforward in attitude and speech.

  • Glorying: (καύχησις   kauchesis) = personal satisfaction; a satisfied contentment with one’s own or another’s achievements.

  • I am filled: (πεπλήρωμαι   pepleromai     Perfect Passive Indicative 1st Person Singular) = become generously supplied with.

  • Comfort: (παρακλήσει   paraklesei) = the act of giving relief in affliction.

  • I am exceeding: (ὑπερπερισσεύομαι   hyperperisseuomai     Present Passive Indicative 1st Person Singular) = abounding beyond; becoming numerous or abundant in a degree greater than normal or than something else.

  • Joyful: (χαρᾷ   chara) = the emotion of great happiness or pleasure.

  • All: (πάσῃ   pase) = every or each.

  • Tribulation: (θλίψει   thlipsei) = an oppressive state of physical, mental, social, or economic adversity.

 

Questions:

  • Share with your group how you were a source of encouragement to another individual.

  • Put forth examples as to how you were bold in the Lord.

  • How can the affliction of the righteous lead to their happiness?

  • What do you see when you consider the future of the Christian Church?

  • Explain why we can depend on the promises of God.

  • Reconciliation: the ending of conflict or the renewing of a friendly relationship between disputing people or groups. Why should we strive for reconciliation within the Church?

 

 

 

 

  1. BASIC REFERENCES: See the footnotes as listed and the Web Resources posted at the beginning of this website: www.mosesharrisevangelisticassociation.org.

     

    http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=I.4640811742463136&pid=1.7&w=194&h=155&c=7&rs=1

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    http://ts4.mm.bing.net/th?id=I.4744255983714507&pid=1.7&w=170&h=149&c=7&rs=1

  2. SUGGESTED SONGS:

     

 

  • Because He Lives
  • Draw Me Nearer
  • Every Promise in the Book Is Mine
  • Every Word of God Is Right; Hallelujah to His Name
  • Give Him the Glory; Give Him Praise
  • Holy, Holy, Holy
  • How Great Is our God
  • How Great Thou Art
  • I Trust in God Wherever I May Be
  • I’m a Soldier, in the Army of the Lord
  • Let the Spirit Lead You
  • Lord, Send a Revival
  • Love Lifted Me
  • My Hope Is Built
  • Speak to My Heart

 

 

  • The Lord Delivered Me one Day, Why Should I Be Bound
  • The Lord Is My Light and My Salvation, Whom Shall I Fear (See Psalm 27:1, 5, 14)
  • Trust and Obey
  • We Are Our Heavenly Father’s Children
  • We Are Soldiers, in the Army
  • What a Fellowship
  • When I Think of the Goodness of Jesus
  • Where Could I Go But to the Lord
  • Without God, I Could Do Nothing
  • Worthy; Jesus Is Worthy; He Is Worthy to Be Praised
  • Wounded for Me
  • Yes, Lord

 

See www.nethymnal.org for additional songs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VI.             LESSONS FOR THIS QUARTER: THE PEOPLE OF GOD SET PRIORITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hope and Confidence Come from God

 

June 1

Obey the Lord

Haggai 1:1-11 

June 8

Trust God’s Promises

Haggai 1:12-2:9

June 15

Live Pure Lives

Haggai 2:10-19

June 22

Hope for a New Day

Haggai 2:23; Zechariah 4:1-3, 6-14

 

Living as a Community of Believers

 

June 29

Pursue Unity in Christ

1 Corinthians 1:10-17; 3:4-9

July 6

Glorify God with Your Body

1 Corinthians 6:12-20

July 13

Exercise Freedom with Caution

1 Corinthians 8

July 20

Overcome Temptation

1 Corinthians 10:6-22

July 27

Seek the Good of Others

1 Corinthians 14:13-26

 

 

 

 

Bearing One Another’s Burdens

 

August 3

Comfort in Times of Trouble

2 Corinthians 1:3-11

August 10

Forgiveness and Restoration

2 Corinthians 1:23-2:11

August 17

Treasure in Earthen Vessels

2 Corinthians 4:1-15

August 24

An Appeal for Reconciliation

2 Corinthians 6:1-13; 7:1-4

 

http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=H.4740073169487104&w=288&h=184&c=7&rs=1&pid=1.7

 

August 31

Generosity in the Midst of Poverty

2 Corinthians 8:1-14

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have a blessed day in the Lord!!!      

Dr. Harris         

 

 



[1] Dockery, David S. “The Pauline Letters.” Holman Concise Bible Commentary. Ed. David S. Dockery. Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1998. 561. Print.

[2] Arndt, William, Frederick W. Danker, and Walter Bauer. A Greek-English lexicon of the New Testament and other early Christian literature 2000 : 834. Print.

 

Treasure in Earthen Vessels

2 Corinthians 4:1-15                                                                       Sunday, August 17, 2014

 

 

http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?&id=HN.608031983400715312&w=300&h=300&c=0&pid=1.9&rs=0&p=0Lesson Aims:

  • To promote the reading and understanding of

            God’s Word (Nehemiah 8:8);

  • To remind ourselves that our human frame is a container

            for something extremely valuable;

  • To identify and discuss those qualities that arise from faith

                                          in the redemptive ministry of Jesus Christ.

 

 

  1. Devotional Reading:  Jude 17-25.  List three insights that you gained from studying this passage.  

     

     

  2. Memory Verse: 2 Corinthians 4:8-9       8 We are troubled on every side, yet not distressed; we are perplexed, but not in despair; 9 Persecuted, but not forsaken; cast down, but not destroyed;

     

     

  3.  

    http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=HN.608040173751634508&w=221&h=172&c=7&rs=1&pe=1&mo=10_30&pid=1.7

     

    on 2 Corinthians. The Church at Corinth. 2 Corinthians

Paul is the author of this letter (1:1; 10:1). It is the apostle’s most personal and pastoral letter. While it is a different kind of letter than Romans or even 1 Corinthians, it is characterized by his style. It contains more autobiographical material than any of his other writings.

The letter is difficult to date, for we do not know the amount of time that separated 1 and 2 Corinthians. It has been variously dated between a.d. 55 and 57.

Purpose and Theology. The primary purpose of 2 Corinthians was to prepare the church at Corinth for another visit from Paul. The letter was penned at a difficult time between Paul and the Corinthians. Paul communicated his thankful relief that the crisis at Corinth had somewhat subsided. Moreover, Paul wrote to them concerning the collection that he wanted to gather for the church at Jerusalem.

Paul exercised extraordinary vigor in declaring his role and authority as an apostle. His opponents, the so-called “super apostles” (see 2 Cor. 10–13), had challenged Paul’s apostolic status and leadership. In return Paul authenticated his apostolic calling and ministry.

The self-portrait of Paul is one of the most fascinating features of this letter. Second Corinthians gives invaluable autobiographical information. Dominant motifs include Paul’s gratitude to God and Christ (1:3; 5:14) and his ministry as a continuing triumph in Christ (2:14). Paul shared the risen life of Christ (4:10–11). Simultaneously he gloried in infirmities and was content with weaknesses, persecutions, and calamities for the sake of Christ (12:9). His ministry was characterized by integrity and suffering (1:8–12; 6:3–10; 11:23–29), marks of a true apostle. His message as an ambassador of Christ focused on the message of reconciliation (5:11–21) and Jesus Christ as Lord (4:5).

Paul’s collection for the church at Jerusalem had an important role in his missionary efforts. He devoted two chapters to this matter (chaps. 8–9). They provide some of the most helpful teaching on Christian stewardship found in the New Testament.[1]

 

 

 

IV.             THOUGHTS TO CONSIDER:         

 

2 Corinthians 4:1-15:

 

1 Therefore seeing we have this ministry, as we have received mercy, we faint not;

 

  • Seeing we have: (ἔχοντες   echontes     Present Active Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = possessing, either in a concrete or an abstract sense.

  • Ministry: (διακονίαν   diakonian) = a role especially done in service to others.

  • We have received mercy: (ἠλεήθημεν   eleethemen     Aorist Passive Indicative 1st Person Plural) = we became the recipients of leniency and compassion

  • We faint not: (οὐκ ἐγκακοῦμεν   egkakoumen     Present Active Indicative 1st Person Plural) = we are not disheartened; we do not become discouraged or disheartened; we do not lose spirit.

 

Questions:

  • While considering God as a parent, God as showing forgiveness, or God as Judge, discuss how He has shown mercy to you.

  • Why do we not want God to withhold His mercies from us?

  • Why should we show acts of mercy to others?

  • How is Evangelism, the exercising of the Great Commission, an act of mercy?

 

But have renounced the hidden things of dishonesty, not walking in craftiness, nor handling the word of God deceitfully; but by manifestation of the truth commending ourselves to every man's conscience in the sight of God.

 

  • Have renounced: (ἀπειπάμεθα   apeipametha     Aorist Middle Indicative 1st Person Plural) = have denounced; have expressed strong disapproval of, especially to distance oneself from the thing denounced.

  • Hidden: (κρυπτὰ   krypta) = secret; something (whether information or object) that remains concealed from others.

  • Dishonesty: (αἰσχύνης   aischynes) = an act that brings (or should bring) shame, whether or not the shame is actualized.

  • Walking: (περιπατοῦντες   peripatountes     Present Active 1st Person Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = living or behaving in a specified manner.  

  • Craftiness: (πανουργίᾳ   panourgia) = cunning; deceitfulness usually characterizing an especially wicked character.

  • Handling: (δολοῦντες   dolountes     Present Active 1st Person Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = falsifying; deceptively making a message false (as by mutilation or addition).

  • Word: (λόγον   logon) = a communication that is most often spoken, but can come through other means.

  • God: (Θεοῦ   Theou) = the Creator, Sustainer, and Ruler of all that exists.

  • Manifestation: (φανερώσει   phanerosei) = disclosure or announcement; a clear indication of the existence or presence or nature of some person or thing.

  • Truth: (ἀληθείας   aletheias) = a message that conforms to reality or actuality, whether historical (in space and time) or supernatural.

  • Commending: (συνιστώντες   synistontes     Present Active 1st Person Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = recommending; presenting as worthy of regard, kindness, or confidence.

  • Every: (πᾶσαν   pasan) = each.

  • Conscience: (συνείδησιν   syneidesin) = the psychological faculty that distinguishes between right and wrong, either afflicting or comforting persons depending upon their actions.

  • Man’s: (ἀνθρώπων   anthropon) = a human being, sometimes referred to collectively as people.

  • Sight: (ἐνώπιον   enopion) = before, among, or in the presence of.

 

Questions:

  • Reflect on your new life in Christ and the behaviors that you have renounced. How has your life improved?

  • Discuss what Revelation 22:18-19 says about the consequences of handling the Word of God. How did this passage impact you?

  • Why should Christian leaders not practice deceit?

  • How does practicing deceit come against the sovereignty of God?

  • Fidelity in marriage, fulfilling family obligations, honoring vows, dutiful service, and trustworthy speech and conduct are examples of loyalty and commitment within human relationships. Why are the aforementioned behaviors important?

 

 

But if our gospel be hid, it is hid to them that are lost:

 

  • Hid: (κεκαλυμμένον   kekalymmenon     Perfect Singular Nominative Neuter Passive Participle) = become unknown by virtue of concealment, secrecy, or complexity.

  • Gospel: (εὐαγγέλιον   euangelion) = good news concerning the now present example of Jesus’ divine dominion and way of salvation by His death, burial, and resurrection.

  • To them that are lost: (ἀπολλυμένοις   apollymenois     Present Plural Dative Masculine Participle Deponent) = those perishing spiritually; those becoming without spiritual life and who are under the condemnation of God.

 

Questions:

  • Using 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 as a point of departure, give a definition of Gospel.

  • Why are some people confused as to the message of the Gospel?

  • List and discuss some of the causes of spiritual darkness.

  • Describe your current spiritual condition.

  • After reading Jeremiah 33:3 discuss one means of overcoming confusion.

 

 

In whom the god of this world hath blinded the minds of them which believe not, lest the light of the glorious gospel of Christ, who is the image of God, should shine unto them.

 

  • God: (Θεὸς   theos) = a supernatural being worshipped as controlling some part of the world or some aspect of life or who is the personification of a force.

  • World: (αἰῶνος   aionos) = evil age; a particular stage of history understood according to its values, beliefs, and morals in distinction to God’s.

  • Hath blinded: (ἐτύφλωσε   etyphlose   Aorist Active Indicative 3rd Person Singular) = hath made unable or unwilling to perceive or understand, conceived as rendering a person unable to see.

  • Minds: (νοήματα   noemata) = thought; the content of what a person is thinking about.

  • Them which believe not: (ἀπίστων   apiston) = unbelievers; persons characterized by lack of trust in Jesus as Messiah and disobedience to His revealed way of life.

  • Should shine: (αὐγάσαι   augasai     Aorist Active Infinitive) = to see distinctly; to see clearly in bright illumination.

  • Light: (φωτισμὸν   photismon) = the act of giving off illumination.

  • Glorious: (δόξης   doxes) = the manifest presentation of God’s infinite and majestic nature, normally conveyed to humanity as superlative brightness.

  • Christ: (Χριστοῦ   Christou) = the Anointed One of God; the Messiah; the Son of God.

  • Image: (εἰκὼν   eikon) = a visual representation (of an object or scene or person or abstraction).

 

Questions:

  • Discuss how Christ is the image of God.

  • How are the values and beliefs of this age different from the values and beliefs of God?

  • Who is the god of this world? Why do we not want to be a part of his kingdom?

  • List and discuss examples of spiritual blindness. How are darkness and blindness symbols for sin?

  • Define and discuss the concept of spiritual warfare. Why does spiritual warfare exist?

  • Why are some people unwilling to receive the truth of the Gospel?

  • Consider the thoughts that constantly occupy your mind, whether they are within the parameters established by God. See Philippians 4:8.

  • What is Christlikeness? How do you know that your lifestyle is reflective of Jesus Christ?

  • What does this verse four tell us about the divinity of Jesus Christ?

  • Why do some people not exercise faith in Jesus Christ?

 

For we preach not ourselves, but Christ Jesus the Lord; and ourselves your servants for Jesus' sake.

 

  • We preach: (κηρύσσομεν   keryssomen   Present Active Indicative 1st Person Plural) = announce or herald; make known (important news) publicly and loudly (as if a herald).

  • Jesus: (Ἰησοῦν   Iesoun) = the Son of God, the Saviour of mankind, God incarnate.

  • Lord: (Κύριον   kyrion) = he to whom a person or thing belongs, about which he has power of deciding; master; the possessor and disposer of a thing; the owner; one who has control of the person.

  • Servants: (δούλους   doulous) = slaves; persons legally owned by someone else and whose entire livelihood and purpose was determined by their master.

 

Questions:

  • Define Gospel. Use 1 Corinthians 15:1-4 as a starting point for your definition.

  • After considering the above definition for servant, reflect on your current position in the Kingdom of God. Are you truly in the role of a slave in the Kingdom of God?  

  • How is your life a reflection of your servanthood in the Kingdom of God?

  • Define servant leadership.

  • Why are Jesus’ resurrection and priesthood and second coming reflections of His Lordship?

  • Who are what are you preaching? Does your preaching agree with the Word of God? Discuss.

 

For God, who commanded the light to shine out of darkness, hath shined in our hearts, to give the light of the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ.

 

  • Commanded: (εἶπον   eipon     Aorist Active Singular Nominative Masculine Participle) = the One Who expressed in words; the One Who ordered or directed.

  • Darkness: (σκότους   skotous) = the absence of light or illumination.

  • Light: (φῶς   phos) = illumination, brilliance, radiance.

  • To shine: (λάμψαι   lampsai     Future Active 3rd Person Singular) = emit light; be bright, as of the sun.

  • Hearts: (καρδίαις   kardiais) = the locus of a person’s thoughts (mind), volition, emotions, and knowledge of right from wrong (conscience).

  • Knowledge: (γνώσεως   gnoseos) = cognitive content; the sum or range of what has been perceived, discovered, or learned.

 

Questions:

  • Discuss the sovereignty of God as it relates to all of creation. What did you conclude?

  • What is the relationship of God to all of creation?

  • How has the Word of God impacted your heart?

  • Who is the Light of the world? Why?

  • Discuss how the Holy Spirit has brought your heart into conformity with the will of God.

 

But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, that the excellency of the power may be of God, and not of us.

 

  • We have: (Ἔχομεν   echomen     Present Active Indicative 1st Person Plural) = we possess.

  • Treasure: (θησαυρὸν   thesauron) = accumulated wealth in the form of money.

  • Earthen:  (ὀστρακίνοις   ostrakinois) = relating to or composed of potter’s clay.

  • Vessels: (σκεύεσιν   skeuesin) = objects used as containers for storing.

  • Excellency: (ὑπερβολὴ   hyperbole) = extraordinary overabundance; the state of having extremely (even superlatively) more than is necessary.

  • Power: (δυνάμεως   dynameos) = possession of controlling influence, often understood as manifesting influence over reality in a supernatural manner.

 

Questions:

  • Which is more important? The vessel or the treasure contained in the vessel? Which is more important? The box or the jewelry inside? Discuss.

  • What is this treasure that is found in a jar of clay?

  • Discuss how our human body is no more than a container. What did you conclude?

  • Contrast your inward being with your outward appearance. How are they similar and how are they different?

  • How can our inward being become more like Jesus Christ?

  • How should we respond when we become aware of our human weaknesses?

  • How is God’s power limited only by His character?

  • Do you have everything that you need to be an effective minister of God? Discuss.

We are troubled on every side, yet not distressed; we are perplexed, but not in despair;

 

  • Troubled: (θλιβόμενοι   thlibomenoi     Present Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = caused to be distressed; brought into difficulties or distress or suffering.

  • Distressed: (στενοχωρούμενοι   stenochoroumenoi     Present Passive Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = being a without hope of escape, survival, or other positive outcomes, possibly conceived of as an extremely narrow area from which no physical escape can be found.

  • Perplexed: (ἀπορούμενοι   aporoumenoi     Present Plural Nominative Masculine Participle Deponent) = being or becoming filled with confusion resulting from failure to understand.

  • Despair: (ἐξαπορούμενοι   exaporoumenoi     Present Plural Nominative Masculine Participle Deponent) = falling apart; losing one’s emotional or mental composure.

 

Questions:

  • How do you react when you find yourself in a hopeless situation?

  • List and discuss some of the causes of despair. Despair can be defined as misery, anguish, hopelessness, despondency, depression, or dejection; a profound feeling that there is no hope.

  • What happens when people lose hope?

  • What should we do when things fall apart? Have you ever just lost it? How did you respond?

  • List and discuss some of the possible causes of stress in your life. What did you conclude?

  • Why do people suffer?

  • How do the struggles of life test our Christian faith? Discuss a time when you were tested by the experiences of life. How did this test affect your faith in Jesus Christ?

  • How did God test the faith of Abraham or Gideon or the Apostle Paul?

 

 

Persecuted, but not forsaken; cast down, but not destroyed;

 

  • Persecuted: (διωκόμενοι   diokomenoi     Present Passive Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = being or becoming subject to systematic harassment and attack due to one’s religious beliefs.

  • Not forsaken: (οὐκ ἐγκαταλειπόμενοι   ouk ankataleipomenoi     negative + Present Passive Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = not abandoned by someone at their departure (either intentionally or through neglect).

  • Cast down: (καταβαλλόμενοι   kataballomenoi     Present Passive Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = become fallen as if by receiving a blow.

  • Not destroyed: (οὐκ ἀπολλύμενοι   apollymenoi     Present Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = not damaged irreparably.

 

Questions:

  • Define persecution?

  • Describe persecution in the early Church.

  • How can we who are damaged be restored?

  • Discuss examples of Christian persecution in today’s world.

  • How can the Christian continue to be victorious?

 

10 Always bearing about in the body the dying of the Lord Jesus, that the life also of Jesus might be made manifest in our body.

 

  • Always: (πάντοτε   pantote) = at all times.

  • Dying: (νέκρωσιν   nekrosin) = death; the act of causing someone to die.

  • Body: (σώματι   somati) = the entire structure of an organism, animal, or human being.

  • Bearing about: (περιφέροντες   peripherontes     Present Active Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = transporting to or among many different places.

  • Life: (ζωὴ   zoe) = the condition or state of being animate.

  • Might be made manifest: (φανερωθῇ   phanerothe     Aorist Passive Subjunctive 3rd Person Singular) = to be or become clearly revealed to the mind, the senses, or judgment.

 

Questions:

  • How do you reflect the character of Jesus Christ in your body?

  • Why is the death of Christ on the cross central to the Christian faith?

  • Why did Jesus Christ die on the cross?

  • How do we continue the work of Jesus Christ?

  • List and discuss the characteristics of a surrendered life to Christ.

  • Define self-denial. Why should we deny ourselves for the cause of Christ?

 

11 For we which live are always delivered unto death for Jesus' sake, that the life also of Jesus might be made manifest in our mortal flesh.

 

  • Always: (ἀεί   aei) = at all times; constantly.

  • Live: (ζῶντες   zontes     Present Active Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = those who are animate; those having life.

  • Death: (θάνατον   thanaton) = the event of departure from life.

  • Are delivered: (παραδιδόμεθα   paradidometha     Present Passive Indicative 1st Person Plural) = forced or compelled into a state or condition, conceived of as being handed over to an authority.

  • Life: (ζωὴ   zoe) = the condition of being animate.

  • Mortal: (θνητῇ   thete) = being subject to death.

  • Flesh: (σαρκὶ   sarki) = the physical body of an individual; understood by the body’s soft tissue.

 

Questions:

  • How do we become more Christlike?

  • How do Christians know they are victorious?

  • List and discuss characteristics of a surrendered life.

  • What happens to believers in Jesus Christ when they depart this life? Use 2 Corinthians 5:8 as a point of departure for your discussion.

  • Discuss the kinds of hardships that missionaries and other Christian workers face.

  • Are you willing to die in the service of the Lord? See Philippians 2:17.

  • Discuss your call to the ministry. What has God called you to do? Are you working in the area to which He has called you?

 

 

12 So then death worketh in us, but life in you.

 

  • Worketh: (ἐνεργεῖται   energeitai     Present Middle Indicative 3rd Person Singular) = is functioning; is operative.

 

Questions:

  • Why do we give or expend ourselves in service to others?

  • How are your giving yourself for the good of others?

  • Define self-sacrifice.

  • Why does the world hate the Christian?

  • What things in your life do you need to put to death?

  • Why did Jesus Christ die on Calvary’s cross?

 

 

13 We having the same spirit of faith, according as it is written, I believed, and therefore have I spoken; we also believe, and therefore speak;

 

  • Spirit: (πνεῦμα   pneuma) = breath or life.

  • Faith: (πίστεως   pisteos) = strong confidence in, and reliance upon, someone or something, often with the object of trust understood.

  • It is written: (γεγραμμένον   gegrammenon     Perfect Passive Singular Accusative Neuter Participle) = having been set down or recorded or represented by letters and words.

  • I believed: (Ἐπίστευσα   episteusa     Aorist Active Indicative 1st Person Singular) = I trusted; I had a strong confidence in or reliance upon something or someone.

  • Have I spoken: (ἐλάλησα   elalesa     Aorist Active Indicative 1st Person Singular) = Have I expressed in speech.

 

Questions:

  • How can you increase your faith?

  • Define faith.

  • Why is faith, and not works, the only basis for our salvation?

  • Have you believed the report? See Isaiah 53.

  • What are the characteristics of a true testimony?

  • Should all believers take part in witnessing about Jesus Christ?

  • How does your faith community handle the Great Commission?  See Matthew 28:16-20.

 

14 Knowing that he which raised up the Lord Jesus shall raise up us also by Jesus, and shall present us with you.

 

  • Knowing: (εἰδότες   eidotes     Perfect Active Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = understanding or having knowledge about (someone or something), normally as acquired through reflection or thinking.

  • He which raised up: (ἐγείρας   egeiras     Aorist Active Singular Nominative Masculine Participle) = the one having done the resurrecting, conceived of as causing someone to wake up and rise out of bed.

  • Shall present: (παραστήσει   parastesei     Future Active Indicative 3rd Person Singular) = cause to be in a specified place or in near proximity to something else, often in order to be at someone’s disposal.

 

Questions:

  • What are the benefits of a renewed heart?

  • What is the significance of Jesus’ rising from the dead?

  • Discuss the following teachings in eschatology: the death of Jesus Christ, the Second Coming of Jesus Christ, the resurrection of the dead, the last judgment, heaven, and hell, and share how your knowledge of these teachings help you in your walk with the Lord.

 

15 For all things are for your sakes, that the abundant grace might through the thanksgiving of many redound to the glory of God.

 

  • Grace: (χάρις   charis) = goodwill freely disseminated (by God), especially to the benefit of the recipient regardless of the benefit accrued to the disseminator.

  • Abundant: (πλεονάσασα   pleonasasa     Aorist Active Singular Nominative Feminine Participle) = increased or become bigger or greater in amount.  

  • Many: (πλειόνων   pleionon) = a quantifier meaning greater in number.

  • Thanksgiving: (εὐχαριστίαν   eucharistian) = the act of expressing gratitude or showing appreciation to someone.

  • Redound: (περισσεύσῃ   perisseuse     Aorist Active Subjunctive 3rd Person Singular) = be abundant or plentiful; abound; exist in large quantities.

 

Questions:

  • How has God demonstrated His grace in your life?

  • How do you give glory to God for His workings in your life?

  • Which is more important? That which does the housing or that which is housed?

  • Why should our inner being take priority over our outward person?

  • How are you handling your treasure in your vessel of clay?

     

  1. BASIC REFERENCES: See the footnotes as listed and the Web Resources posted at the beginning of this website: www.mosesharrisevangelisticassociation.org.

     

    http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=I.4640811742463136&pid=1.7&w=194&h=155&c=7&rs=1

    http://ts4.mm.bing.net/th?id=I.4744255983714507&pid=1.7&w=170&h=149&c=7&rs=1

  2. SUGGESTED SONGS:

     

 

  • Every Promise in the Book Is Mine
  • Every Word of God Is Right; Hallelujah to His Name
  • Faith, Faith, Faith, Just a Little More Faith
  • Friendship with Jesus
  • Give Him the Glory; Give Him Praise
  • He Is Lord
  • Holy, Holy, Holy
  • How Great Is our God
  • How Great Thou Art
  • I Go to the Rock
  • I Have Decided to Follow Jesus
  • I Love Him (2x); Because He First Loved Me; and Purchased My Salvation on Calvary
  • I Trust in God Wherever I May Be
  • I Want to Be More and More Like Jesus Every Day
  • I Will Trust in the Lord (3x); Until I Die
  • I’ll Rise Again
  • Let the Spirit Lead You
  • Lord, Send a Revival
  • Love Lifted Me
  • Speak to My Heart

 

 

  • My Hope Is Built
  • Seek Ye First the Kingdom of God
  • Standing on the Promises of God
  • The Comforter Has Come
  • The Joy of the Lord Is our Strength
  • The Lord Delivered Me One Day (3x); Why Should I Be Bound
  • The Lord Is My Light and My Salvation, Whom Shall I Fear (See Psalm 27:1, 5, 14)
  • Trust and Obey
  • Victory in Jesus
  • Walk in the Light
  • We Are Our Heavenly Father’s Children
  • Whadda You Know about Jesus; He’s Alright
  • What a Fellowship
  • Where Could I Go But to the Lord
  • Without God, I Could Do Nothing
  • Worthy; Jesus Is Worthy; He Is Worthy to Be Praised
  • Wounded for Me
  • Yes, Lord

 

See www.nethymnal.org for additional songs

 

 

 

VII.          LESSONS FOR THIS QUARTER: THE PEOPLE OF GOD SET PRIORITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hope and Confidence Come from God

 

June 1

Obey the Lord

Haggai 1:1-11 

June 8

Trust God’s Promises

Haggai 1:12-2:9

June 15

Live Pure Lives

Haggai 2:10-19

June 22

Hope for a New Day

Haggai 2:23; Zechariah 4:1-3, 6-14

 

Living as a Community of Believers

 

June 29

Pursue Unity in Christ

1 Corinthians 1:10-17; 3:4-9

July 6

Glorify God with Your Body

1 Corinthians 6:12-20

July 13

Exercise Freedom with Caution

1 Corinthians 8

July 20

Overcome Temptation

1 Corinthians 10:6-22

July 27

Seek the Good of Others

1 Corinthians 14:13-26

 

 

 

 

Bearing One Another’s Burdens

 

August 3

Comfort in Times of Trouble

2 Corinthians 1:3-11

August 10

Forgiveness and Restoration

2 Corinthians 1:23-2:11

August 17

Treasure in Earthen Vessels

2 Corinthians 4:1-15

 

http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=H.4740073169487104&w=288&h=184&c=7&rs=1&pid=1.7

 

August 24

An Appeal for Reconciliation

2 Corinthians 6:1-13; 7:1-4

August 31

Generosity in the Midst of Poverty

2 Corinthians 8:1-14

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have a blessed day in the Lord!!!      

Dr. Harris         

 

 



[1] Dockery, David S. “The Pauline Letters.” Holman Concise Bible Commentary. Ed. David S. Dockery. Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1998. 561. Print.

 

Forgiveness and Restoration

2 Corinthians 1:23-2:11                                                                       Sunday, August 10, 2014

 

 

 

 

FORGIVENESS:

 

http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?&id=HN.608023951804206857&w=300&h=300&c=0&pid=1.9&rs=0&p=0

 

 

RESTORATION:

 

http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?&id=HN.608048549083022874&w=300&h=300&c=0&pid=1.9&rs=0&p=0

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lesson Aims:

  • To promote the reading and understanding of

            God’s Word (Nehemiah 8:8);

  • To encourage all believers in Christ Jesus to practice forgiveness and restoration;
  • To discuss examples of church discipline and reconciliation in the Church.

    

 

  1. Devotional Reading:  Luke 17:1-6.  List three insights that you gained from studying this passage.  

     

     

  2. Memory Verse: 2 Corinthians 2:10 - To whom ye forgive any thing, I forgive also: for if I forgave any thing, to whom I forgave it, for your sakes forgave I it in the person of Christ.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

  3.  

    http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=HN.608040173751634508&w=221&h=172&c=7&rs=1&pe=1&mo=10_30&pid=1.7

     

    on 2 Corinthians. The Church at Corinth. 2 Corinthians

Paul is the author of this letter (1:1; 10:1). It is the apostle’s most personal and pastoral letter. While it is a different kind of letter than Romans or even 1 Corinthians, it is characterized by his style. It contains more autobiographical material than any of his other writings.

The letter is difficult to date, for we do not know the amount of time that separated 1 and 2 Corinthians. It has been variously dated between a.d. 55 and 57.

Purpose and Theology. The primary purpose of 2 Corinthians was to prepare the church at Corinth for another visit from Paul. The letter was penned at a difficult time between Paul and the Corinthians. Paul communicated his thankful relief that the crisis at Corinth had somewhat subsided. Moreover, Paul wrote to them concerning the collection that he wanted to gather for the church at Jerusalem.

Paul exercised extraordinary vigor in declaring his role and authority as an apostle. His opponents, the so-called “super apostles” (see 2 Cor. 10–13), had challenged Paul’s apostolic status and leadership. In return Paul authenticated his apostolic calling and ministry.

The self-portrait of Paul is one of the most fascinating features of this letter. Second Corinthians gives invaluable autobiographical information. Dominant motifs include Paul’s gratitude to God and Christ (1:3; 5:14) and his ministry as a continuing triumph in Christ (2:14). Paul shared the risen life of Christ (4:10–11). Simultaneously he gloried in infirmities and was content with weaknesses, persecutions, and calamities for the sake of Christ (12:9). His ministry was characterized by integrity and suffering (1:8–12; 6:3–10; 11:23–29), marks of a true apostle. His message as an ambassador of Christ focused on the message of reconciliation (5:11–21) and Jesus Christ as Lord (4:5).

Paul’s collection for the church at Jerusalem had an important role in his missionary efforts. He devoted two chapters to this matter (chaps. 8–9). They provide some of the most helpful teaching on Christian stewardship found in the New Testament.[1]

 

 

 

 

 

IV.             THOUGHTS TO CONSIDER:          2 Corinthians 1:23-24; 2:1-11:

 

2 Corinthians 1:23-24:

 

23 Moreover I call God for a record upon my soul, that to spare you I came not as yet unto Corinth.

 

  • Record: (μάρτυρα   martyra) = witness; someone who sees an event and reports what happens.

  • God: (Θεὸν   Theon) = the Creator, Sustainer, and Ruler of all that exists.

  • Call: (ἐπικαλοῦμαι   epikaloumai     Present Indicative 1st Person Singular Deponent) = invoke for assistance or protection, especially as a recognition of submission and deference to a specific deity.

  • Soul: (ψυχήν   psychen) = a person understood according to his or her immaterial aspect, especially as the agency by which a person obtains salvation.

  • To spare: (φειδόμενος   pheidomenos     Present Singular Nominative Participle Masculine 1st Person Deponent) = saving or relieving from an experience or action.

  • I came: (ἦλθον   elthon     Aorist Active Indicative 1st Person Singular) = moved toward, traveled toward, or approached.

  • Corinth: (Κόρινθον   Korinthon) = an ancient and famous city of Greece, on the Isthmus of Corinth, and about 40 miles (65 km) west of Athens.

 

Questions:

  • What does God say about you and about your lifestyle?

  • Why should we exercise patience toward those who are in need of correction?

  • Why was Paul able to appeal to God concerning Paul’s intended actions?

 

 

24 Not for that we have dominion over your faith, but are helpers of your joy: for by faith ye stand.

 

  • We have dominiion over: (κυριεύομεν   kyrieuomen     Present Active Indicative 1st Person Plural) = exercise control over someone as that person’s master. See Mark 10:35-45.

  • Faith: (πίστεως   pisteos) = trust in the gospel; trust in Jesus as contained in the content of the Gospel.

  • Helpers: (συνεργοί   synergoi) = fellow workers.

  • Joy: (χαρᾶς   charas) = the emotion of great happiness and pleasure.

  • Ye stand: (ἑστήκατε   hestekate     Perfect Active Indicative 2nd Person Plural) = you have remained steadfast or upright.

 

 

 

Questions:

  • Define dominion theology.

  • To whom should we submit ourselves? Why?

  • Who is your master? Discuss.

  • How does one receive eternal salvation?  Describe your most recent encounter when talking with a sinner about salvation.

  • Define faith, and share with your group how you apply this definition to your life.

  • Why can believers in Jesus Christ remain steadfast in any situation?

 

 

2 Corinthians 2:1-11:

 

1 But I determined this with myself, that I would not come again to you in heaviness.

 

  • I determined: (ἔκρινα   ekrina     Aorist Active Indicative 1st Person Singular) = I resolved; I became determined in mind of a fixed opinion or purpose.  

  • Again: (πάλιν   palin) = once more.

  • Would come: (ἐλθειν   elthein     Aorist Active Infinitive) = to move toward, to travel toward, or to approach someone.

  • Heaviness: (λύπῃ   lype) = emotional pain experienced when sorrowful or unhappy.

 

Questions:

  • Why should we consider our emotional state as we interact with others?

  • List and discuss causes of pain in your life. What did you conclude?

  • List and discuss examples of pain in your life. What did you conclude?

  • What are some of the spiritual implications for the pain that we undergo?

 

SUGGESTION: As you respond to the above questions, consider physical, mental, and spiritual pain.

 

 

For if I make you sorry, who is he then that maketh me glad, but the same which is made sorry by me?

 

  • Make sorry: (λυπῶ   lypo     Present Active Indicative 1st Person Singular) = grieve, sadden, vex, irritate, or offend.

  • That maketh glad: (εὐφραίνων   euphrainon   Present Active Singular Nominative Masculine Participle) = the one making happy or joyful.

  • Which is made sorry: (λυπούμενος   lypoumenos     Present Passive Singular Nominative Masculine Participle) = being  saddened or caused to feel unhappiness.

 

 

 

Questions:

  • Discuss how failure and sin cause unhappiness in our lives and the lives of others.

  • Discuss how repentance and restoration cause joy in our lives and in the lives of others.

  • What is it like when we restore someone to a fellowship that was broken?

  • List and discuss examples of unhappiness experienced by Jesus Christ.

 

 

And I wrote this same unto you, lest, when I came, I should have sorrow from them of whom I ought to rejoice; having confidence in you all, that my joy is the joy of you all.

 

  • I wrote: (ἔγραψα   egrapsa     Aorist Active Indicative 1st Person Singular) = I communicated or expressed by putting words, letters, numbers, or other notations on a surface by using a pen, pencil, or other instrument.

  • I should have: (ἔχω   echo     Present Active Subjunctive 1st Person Singular) = possess or bear.

  • Ought: (ἔδει   edei  Imperfect Active Indicative 3rd Person Singular) = should have made; required by obligation or compulsion; should make; should give; or should be making.

  • To rejoice: (χαίρειν   chairein     Present Active Infinitive) = to feel happiness, delight, pleasure, or joy.

  • Having confidence: (πεποιθὼς   pepoithos   Perfect Active Participle Masculine Singular Nominative) = having been convinced or persuaded of the truthfulness or validity of something.

 

Questions:

  • Discuss your confidence in Jesus Christ.

  • How can we cause a righteous leader to rejoice?

  • Why should believers rejoice, even in adversity?

  • Discuss how Jesus’ death, burial, and resurrection contribute to our joy.

 

 

For out of much affliction and anguish of heart I wrote unto you with many tears; not that ye should be grieved, but that ye might know the love which I have more abundantly unto you.

 

  • Affliction: (θλίψεως   thlipseos) = an oppressive state of physical, mental, social, or economic adversity.

  • Anguish: (συνοχῆς   synoches) = a distress of an especially oppressive and constricting condition.

  • Heart: (καρδίας   kardias) = the locus of a person’s thoughts (mind), volition, emotions, and knowledge of right from wrong (conscience).

  • Tears: (δακρύων   dakryon) = teardrop; a drop of the clear salty or saline solution secreted by the lacrimal glands.

  • Love: (ἀγάπην   agapen) = a strong, non-sexual affection and regard for a person and their good as understood by God’s moral character, especially characterized by a willing forfeiture of rights or privileges in another person’s behalf.

  • Ye might know: (γνῶτε   gnote     Aorist Active Subjunctive 2nd Person Plural) = have insight or understanding about (someone or something), normally as acquired through observation or the senses.

  • More abundantly: (περισσοτέρως   perissoteros) = especially; to a distinctly greater extent or degree than is common; most of all.

 

 

Questions:

  • Discuss how you normally respond to affliction and anguish of heart.

  • List and discuss some of the causes of suffering.

  • How can our sorrow be turned into joy?

  • How does Paul demonstrate honest concern for the people of God?

  • Why should we love one another?

  • Why is love the greatest? See 1 Corinthians 13:1-13.

 

 

But if any have caused grief, he hath not grieved me, but in part: that I may not overcharge you all.

 

  • Part: (μέρους   merous) = a portion of a whole.

  • I may not overcharge: (μὴ ἐπιβαρῶ   me epibaro     Negative + Present Active Subjunctive 1st Person Singular) = I may not overburden or overload; I may not weigh down with an onerous (burdensome) or difficult concern.

 

Questions:

  • How can we cause grief to others?

  • Why should we be forgiving in our dealings with others?

  • Describe your attitude when someone extended forgiveness to you.

  • After reading Luke 6:37 discuss the principle concerning forgiveness.

  • What should be the limit of our forgiveness toward others? See Luke 17:3-4 and Matthew 18:21-22.

  • What is the believer’s responsibility toward the forgiving of others?

  • What does true love teach us about forgiveness?  See 1 Corinthians 13:1-13.

  • When are you going to forgive the person who recently wronged you?

  • Write a letter to God telling him why you forgive those who have done you wrong. If you desire, share this letter with your group.

 

 

 

 

Sufficient to such a man is this punishment, which was inflicted of many.

 

  • Sufficient: (ἱκανὸν   hikanon) = adequate, appropriate, or befitting.

  • Punishment: (ἐπιτιμία   epitimia) = censure; a formal act or expression of criticism and rebuke.

  • Many: (πλειόνων   pleionon) = majority; the greater in number of two parts; the main part.

 

Questions:

  • List and discuss ways that God disciplines His people.

  • Why is it necessary that discipline be exercised in the Church?

  • Explain the process for Church discipline as reflected in Matthew 18:15-20.

  • Define excommunication. After reading 1 Corinthians 5:1-6 discuss your group’s actions toward those who engage in immoral behavior.

  • How does your faith community restore those who repent of their sins?

  • How does your faith community recognize the authority of Jesus Christ?

 

 

So that contrariwise ye ought rather to forgive him, and comfort him, lest perhaps such a one should be swallowed up with overmuch sorrow.

 

  • Contrariwise: (τοὐναντίον   tounantion) = rather; on the contrary.

  • Rather: (μᾶλλον   mallon) = instead; more; all the more.

  • To forgive: (χαρίσασθαι   charisasthai     Aorist Infinitive) = cancel, pardon; manifest goodwill toward; exonerate; remove an indebtedness; stop being angry about or resenting someone’s behavior; excuse someone for a mistake, misunderstanding, wrongdoing, or inappropriate behavior; cancel an obligation such as a debt.  

  • Comfort: (παρακαλέσαι   parakalesai     Aorist Active Infinitive) = to alleviate sorrow or distress; to give emotional strength to.

  • Overmuch: (περισσοτέρᾳ   perissotera) = greater in size or importance or degree.

  • Should be swallowed up: (καταποθῇ   katapothe     Aorist Passive Subjunctive 3rd Person Singular) = be gulped; be or become swallowed hurriedly or greedily or in one draught.

 

Questions:

  • Describe how you alleviate the sorrow or distress of others.

  • How can we purify the Church from factions or immorality?

  • Why should God’s merciful dealings with us as believers cause us to show similar acts of mercy to others?

  • How did Jesus Christ sympathize with those in distress? See John 11:35 and Hebrews 4:15.

  • Why should we forgive others?

  • What is your duty toward those who are weak?

  • How do you restore those who have gone astray? See Galatians 6:1.

Wherefore I beseech you that ye would confirm your love toward him.

 

  • I beseech: (παρακαλῶ   parakalo     Present Active Indicative 1st Person Singular) = entreat; ask for or request earnestly.

  • That would confirm: (κυρῶσαι   kyrosai     Aorist Active Infinitive) = rule (judicially); decide on and make a formal declaration about.

 

Questions:

  • How does your faith community demonstrate love to a brother or sister who has gone astray?

  • Define sanctification.

  • What are some of the obstacles to sanctification?

  • How can we maintain a closer walk with God?

  • Read Ezekiel 34:4 and then discuss why we sometimes fail to encourage God’s people.

  • Discuss the forgiveness of God as reflected in Psalm 86:5, Daniel 9:9, Micah 7:18, Acts 13:38, Ephesians 4:32, and Colossians 3:13. What did you conclude?

  • How can we show love to our brothers or our sisters in Christ?

 

 

For to this end also did I write, that I might know the proof of you, whether ye be obedient in all things.

 

  • Proof: (δοκιμὴν   dokimen) = the quality of being established as dependable or reliable.

  • Obedient: (ὑπήκοοί   hypekooi) = dutifully complying with the commands or instructions of those in authority.

 

Questions:

  • How does 1 Corinthians 4:2, dealing with the requirement of faithfulness, impact your behavior?

  • Discuss what Acts 5:26-29 says about obeying those in authority when their authority conflicts with God’s desires or plans.  Summarize your conclusions.

 

 

10 To whom ye forgive any thing, I forgive also: for if I forgave any thing, to whom I forgave it, for your sakes forgave I it in the person of Christ;

 

  • Ye forgive: (χαρίζεσθε   charizesthe     Present Indicative 2nd Person Plural) = pardon someone on account of the goodwill one has toward a person.  

  • Person: (προσώπῳ   prosopo) = face; the presence or proximity of someone understood in terms of the face, with the implication of being before or in front of them.

  • Christ: (Χριστοῦ   Christou) = the Anointed One of God; the Messiah.

 

 

Questions:

  • Why does this verse ten repeat some variation of forgiveness several times?

  • Read Matthew 6:9-15, and discuss what Jesus says about forgiveness.

  • Why should we forgive others?

  • What does our not forgiving others reveal about the condition of our heart?

  • How can we keep ourselves from having a hard heart?

     

 

11 Lest Satan should get an advantage of us: for we are not ignorant of his devices.

 

  • Lest: (ἵνα   hina) = in order that.

  • Should get an advantage: (πλεονεκτηθῶμεν   pleonektethomen     Aorist Passive Subjunctive 1st Person Plural) = we be exploited.

  • Satan: (Σατανᾶ   Satana) = adversary (one who opposes another in purpose or act), the name given to the prince of evil spirits, the inveterate adversary of God and Christ; he incites apostasy from God and to sin; the worshippers of idols are said to be under his control; by his demons he is able to take possession of men and inflict them with diseases; by God’s assistance he is overcome; on Christ’s return from heaven he will be bound with chains for a thousand years, but when the thousand years are finished he will walk the earth in yet greater power, but shortly after will be given over to eternal punishment.

  • Devices: (νοήματα   noemata) = the content of what one is thinking about.

  • We are not ignorant of: (οὐκ ἀγνοοῦμεν   ouk agnooumen     negative + Present Active Indicative 1st Person Plural) = we are not lacking in knowledge and information.

 

Questions:

  • Read John 10:10 and discuss the purposes and plans of Satan and the purposes and plans of Jesus for our lives. What did you conclude?

  • Define spiritual warfare.

  • How can we overcome the wiles of the devil?

  • Contrast the character of Satan with the character of Jesus Christ. What did you conclude?

  • After reading 2 Corinthians 10:3-5, discuss how you employ spiritual weaponry for the glory and honor of God.

  • Why should we seek to forgive and to restore others?

     

     

     

     

     

     

 

  1. BASIC REFERENCES: See the footnotes as listed and the Web Resources posted at the beginning of this website: www.mosesharrisevangelisticassociation.org.

     

    http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=I.4640811742463136&pid=1.7&w=194&h=155&c=7&rs=1

     

    http://ts4.mm.bing.net/th?id=I.4744255983714507&pid=1.7&w=170&h=149&c=7&rs=1

  2. SUGGESTED SONGS:

     

 

  • Be Thou My Vision
  • Draw Me Nearer
  • Every Promise in the Book Is Mine
  • Every Word of God Is Right; Hallelujah to His Name
  • Faith, Faith, Faith, Just a Little More Faith
  • Friendship with Jesus
  • He Is Lord
  • Holy, Holy, Holy
  • How Great Is our God
  • How Great Thou Art
  • I Go to the Rock
  • I Have Decided to Follow Jesus
  • I Love Him (2x); Because He First Loved Me; and Purchased My Salvation on Calvary
  • I Trust in God Wherever I May Be
  • I Will Trust in the Lord (3x); Until I Die
  • I’ll Rise Again
  • Let the Spirit Lead You
  • Love Lifted Me
  • Seek Ye First the Kingdom of God
  • Speak to My Heart

 

 

  • Standing on the Promises of God
  • The Comforter Has Come
  • The Joy of the Lord Is our Strength
  • The Lord Delivered Me One Day (3x); Why Should I Be Bound
  • The Lord Is My Light and My Salvation, Whom Shall I Fear (See Psalm 27:1, 5, 14)
  • Trust and Obey
  • Walk in the Light
  • We Are Our Heavenly Father’s Children
  • Whadda You Know about Jesus; He’s Alright
  • What a Fellowship
  • Where Could I God But to the Lord
  • Without God, I Could Do Nothing
  • Worthy; Jesus Is Worthy; He Is Worthy to Be Praised
  • Wounded for Me
  • Yes, Lord

 

See www.nethymnal.org for additional songs

 

 

 

VII.          LESSONS FOR THIS QUARTER: THE PEOPLE OF GOD SET PRIORITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hope and Confidence Come from God

 

June 1

Obey the Lord

Haggai 1:1-11 

June 8

Trust God’s Promises

Haggai 1:12-2:9

June 15

Live Pure Lives

Haggai 2:10-19

June 22

Hope for a New Day

Haggai 2:23; Zechariah 4:1-3, 6-14

 

Living as a Community of Believers

 

June 29

Pursue Unity in Christ

1 Corinthians 1:10-17; 3:4-9

July 6

Glorify God with Your Body

1 Corinthians 6:12-20

July 13

Exercise Freedom with Caution

1 Corinthians 8

July 20

Overcome Temptation

1 Corinthians 10:6-22

July 27

Seek the Good of Others

1 Corinthians 14:13-26

 

 

 

 

Bearing One Another’s Burdens

 

August 3

Comfort in Times of Trouble

2 Corinthians 1:3-11

August 10

Forgiveness and Restoration

2 Corinthians 1:23-2:11

 

http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=H.4740073169487104&w=288&h=184&c=7&rs=1&pid=1.7

 

August 17

Treasure in Earthen Vessels

2 Corinthians 4:1-15

August 24

An Appeal for Reconciliation

2 Corinthians 6:1-13; 7:1-4

August 31

Generosity in the Midst of Poverty

2 Corinthians 8:1-14

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have a blessed day in the Lord!!!      

Dr. Harris         

 



[1] Dockery, David S. “The Pauline Letters.” Holman Concise Bible Commentary. Ed. David S. Dockery. Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1998. 561. Print.

 

Comfort in Times of Trouble

2 Corinthians 1:3-11                                                                                Sunday, August 3, 2014

 

http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=HN.608024574568956137&w=187&h=184&c=7&rs=1&pid=1.7

Lesson Aims:

  • To promote the reading and understanding of

            God’s Word (Nehemiah 8:8);

  • To encourage others to turn to God for comfort;
  • To list and discuss methods of comforting others;
  • To testify as to how we were comforted in a time of

             trouble

  • To remind ourselves that our ultimate comfort is in

             Jesus Christ.

      

 

  1. Devotional Reading:  Psalm 46.  List three insights that you gained from studying this passage.  

     

     

  2. Memory Verses: 2 Corinthians 1:7 - And our hope of you is stedfast, knowing, that as ye are partakers of the sufferings, so shall ye be also of the consolation.

     

    http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=HN.608040173751634508&w=221&h=172&c=7&rs=1&pe=1&mo=10_30&pid=1.7

     

    on 2 Corinthians. The Church at Corinth. 2 Corinthians

Paul is the author of this letter (1:1; 10:1). It is the apostle’s most personal and pastoral letter. While it is a different kind of letter than Romans or even 1 Corinthians, it is characterized by his style. It contains more autobiographical material than any of his other writings.

The letter is difficult to date, for we do not know the amount of time that separated 1 and 2 Corinthians. It has been variously dated between a.d. 55 and 57.

Purpose and Theology. The primary purpose of 2 Corinthians was to prepare the church at Corinth for another visit from Paul. The letter was penned at a difficult time between Paul and the Corinthians. Paul communicated his thankful relief that the crisis at Corinth had somewhat subsided. Moreover, Paul wrote to them concerning the collection that he wanted to gather for the church at Jerusalem.

Paul exercised extraordinary vigor in declaring his role and authority as an apostle. His opponents, the so-called “super apostles” (see 2 Cor. 10–13), had challenged Paul’s apostolic status and leadership. In return Paul authenticated his apostolic calling and ministry.

The self-portrait of Paul is one of the most fascinating features of this letter. Second Corinthians gives invaluable autobiographical information. Dominant motifs include Paul’s gratitude to God and Christ (1:3; 5:14) and his ministry as a continuing triumph in Christ (2:14). Paul shared the risen life of Christ (4:10–11). Simultaneously he gloried in infirmities and was content with weaknesses, persecutions, and calamities for the sake of Christ (12:9). His ministry was characterized by integrity and suffering (1:8–12; 6:3–10; 11:23–29), marks of a true apostle. His message as an ambassador of Christ focused on the message of reconciliation (5:11–21) and Jesus Christ as Lord (4:5).

Paul’s collection for the church at Jerusalem had an important role in his missionary efforts. He devoted two chapters to this matter (chaps. 8–9). They provide some of the most helpful teaching on Christian stewardship found in the New Testament.[1]

 

 

III.             THOUGHTS TO CONSIDER:          2 Corinthians 1:3-11:

 

3 Blessed be God, even the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Father of mercies, and the God of all comfort;

 

  • Blessed: (Εὐλογητὸς   eulogetos) = being praiseworthy.

  • God: (Θεός   Theos) = the Creator, Sustainer, and Ruler of all that exists.

  • Father: (πατὴρ   pater) = parent, progenitor, originator.

  • Our Lord Jesus Christ: (τοῦ κυρίου ἡμῶν Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ   tou kyriou hemon Iseou Christou) = Master, Savior, Anointed One of God; the Savior of Mankind.

  • Mercies: (οἰκτιρμῶν   oiktirmon) = compassion; a deep awareness of and sympathy for another’s suffering.

  • All: (πάσης   pases) = every, each, or every kind of.   

  • Comfort: (παράκλησις   paraklesis) = the act of giving relief or consolation to one in affliction or suffering.

 

Questions:

  • How do you show compassion to someone who is suffering?

  • Discuss the lordship of Jesus Christ. What did you conclude?

  • How has God had mercy on us?

  • Why is God able to give us comfort for every situation that we face?

  • Identify and discuss the source of true peace.

  • Why should we demonstrate sensitivity toward those who are suffering?

4 Who comforteth us in all our tribulation, that we may be able to comfort them which are in any trouble, by the comfort wherewith we ourselves are comforted of God.

 

  • Who comforteth: (παρακαλῶν   parakalon     Present Active Singular Nominative Masculine Participle) = the one alleviating sorrow or distress; the one giving emotional strength to another.

  • Tribulation: (θλίψει   thlipsei) = distressed condition; an oppressive state of physical, mental, social, or economic adversity.

  • May be able: (δύνασθαι   dynasthai     Present Infinitive Deponent) = be or become sufficient to meet a need or task.

  • To comfort: (παρακαλεῖν   parakalein     Present Active Infinitive) = to alleviate sorrow or distress; to give emotional strength to.

 

Questions:

  • Why do we as believers in Jesus Christ need to be strengthened?

  • Why do believers in Jesus Christ experience tribulation?

  • Describe your approach for comforting those in a distressed condition.

  • Why do we need the Holy Spirit (Holy Ghost) working in our lives?

  • Discuss a loss that you experienced, and share how someone provided comfort to you.

  • To whom do you go when you find yourself experiencing sorrow or distress?

  • Describe how you show love or sympathy to those who need comforting.

  • Should we provide comfort for those responsible for their own negative condition?

 

 

5 For as the sufferings of Christ abound in us, so our consolation also aboundeth by Christ.

 

  • Abound: (περισσεύει   perisseuei     Present Active Indicative 3rd Person Singular) = to be abundant or plentiful; exist in large quantities.

  • Sufferings: (παθήματα   pathemata) = a state of great suffering and affliction due to adversity.

  • Consolation: (Same as comfort of verse three).

 

Questions:

  • Why do the righteous suffer?

  • How would you comfort someone who is worried, lonely, weary, or discouraged?

  • Discuss how the suffering of Jesus Christ both provides redemption and serves as an example to believers.

  • Describe your patience in comforting someone who tells you the same account of their life experiences over and over and over.

  • Give an example of God’s Word bringing comfort to your life.

  • Read and discuss your favorite Bible passage concerning comfort for your life.

  • How has Jesus Christ brought comfort to humanity in times of trouble?

6 And whether we be afflicted, it is for your consolation and salvation, which is effectual in the enduring of the same sufferings which we also suffer: or whether we be comforted, it is for your consolation and salvation.

 

  • We be afflicted: (θλιβόμεθα   thlibometha     Present Indicative 1st Person Plural Deponent) = to be caused to be distressed; to be brought into difficulties or distress or suffering.

  • Salvation: (σωτηρίας   soterias) = the state of being delivered or preserved from harm (of judgment), especially as what that state entails, a safe haven in heaven.

  • Which is effectual: (ἐνεργουμένης   energoumenes     Present Middle Singular Genitive Feminine Participle) = functioning; doing what something is used for; performing as expected when operating.

  • Enduring: (ὑπομονῇ   hypomone) = the power to withstand hardship or stress; especially the inward fortitude necessary; steadfast endurance.  

  • Sufferings: (παθημάτων   pathematon) = a state of great suffering and distress due to adversity.

  • We be comforted: (παρακαλούμεθα   parakaloumetha     Present Passive Indicative 1st Person Plural) = we are exhorted; we are or we become earnestly supported or encouraged for a response or action.

 

Questions:

  • How has God worked for your consolation and salvation?

  • Is salvation possible to all people? Will all people be saved? Are you saved? How do you know?

  • Why do the people of God undergo affliction?

  • Discuss how you have endured through trial or opposition.

 

 

7 And our hope of you is stedfast, knowing, that as ye are partakers of the sufferings, so shall ye be also of the consolation.

 

  • Hope: (ἐλπὶς   elpis) = a reasonable and confident expectation of a future event.

  • Stedfast: (βεβαία   bebaia) = secure, established; not likely to fail or give way.

  • Knowing: (εἰδότες   eidotes   Perfect Active Plural Nominative Masculine Participle) = having had knowledge about (someone or something), normally as acquired through reflection or thinking.

  • Partakers: (κοινωνοί   koinonoi) = collaborator; an associate in an activity or endeavor or sphere of common interest, especially one in which the associates both participate in the profits or benefits.

 

Questions:

  • Why do people, saint or sinner, experience suffering?

  • Should believers expect suffering as an inevitable part of their Christian life?

  • Read and discuss what the word of God says about the suffering of His followers. See, for example, Matthew 10:22, 10:17, 23:34, 24:9; Luke 21:16-17; Acts 14:22; 2 Timothy 3:12; Philippians 1:29; 1 John 3:13; and Revelation 2:10.

     

  • Why does suffering often come before consolation?

  • Discuss how suffering develops the character of believers and draws them closer to Jesus Christ?

  • How can suffering prepare us for eternal life?

 

 

8 For we would not, brethren, have you ignorant of our trouble which came to us in Asia, that we were pressed out of measure, above strength, insomuch that we despaired even of life:

 

  • We would not: (oὐ θέλομεν   ou thelomen     Present Active Indicative 1st Person Plural Negative) = we do not have a desire for; we do not want strongly.

  • Ignorant: (ἀγνοεῖν   agnoein     Present Active Infinitive) = to be lacking in knowledge or information.  

  • Brethren: (ἀδελφοί   adelphoi) = believers understood as one’s own siblings in God’s family.

  • Trouble: (Same as tribulation of verse four).

  • Came: (γενομένης   genomenes     Aorist Singular Genitive Feminine Participle Deponent) = having happened.

  • Asia: (Ἀσίᾳ   Asia) = Asia proper or proconsular Asia embracing Mysia, Lydia, Phrygia, and Caria, corresponding closely to Turkey today.

  • Out of measure: (ὑπερβολὴν   hyperbolen) = extraordinary overabundance; the state of having extremely (even superlatively) more than is necessary.

  • We were pressed: (ἐβαρήθημεν   ebarethemen   Aorist Passive Indicative 1st Person Plural) = we were grieved or burdened; we were distressed with extreme sorrow, conceived of as bearing a burden too heavy (for a psychological feature) to bear.

  • Strength: (δύναμιν   dynamin) = ability; the quality of being able to perform, especially a quality that permits or facilitates achievement or accomplishment.

  • Despaired: (ἐξαπορηθῆναι   exaporethenai     Aorist Infinitive Deponent) = to fall apart; to lose one’s emotional or mental composure.

  • Life: (ζῆν   zen     Present Active Infinitive) = to be animate; existence in the physical world; the quality that makes living animals and plants different from dead organisms and inorganic matter. Its functions include the ability to take in food, adapt to the environment, grow, and reproduce.

 

Questions:

  • How do you know that you are part of the family of God? Or, who are your brothers and sisters and mothers? See Matthew 12:50.

  • How do you respond when you are burdened excessively?   See 1 Peter 4:12-19.

  • How do you respond when things fall apart? Have you ever lost it? What did you do? To whom did you go?

  • Discuss the trouble that happened to Paul and the others in Asia. See Acts 19:21-41.

  • Give the meaning of 1 Corinthians 16:9, and apply its meaning to your current Christian walk.

  • How is God comforting you during this period of your life?

  • How does God help His people during hardship? See Deuteronomy 8:16, 1 Kings 17:2-9, and Philippians 4:19.

  • Discuss the following verse: Psalm 132:1. What did you discover?

 

 

9 But we had the sentence of death in ourselves, that we should not trust in ourselves, but in God which raiseth the dead:

 

  • Sentence: (ἀπόκριμα   apokrima) = official decision; an official position or opinion or judgment reached after consideration, especially referring to legal decisions made by a judge.

  • Death: (θανάτου   thanatou) = the event of departure from life.

  • Had: (ἐσχήκαμεν   eschekamen     Perfect Active Indicative 1st Person Plural) = we possessed.

  • We should not trust: (μὴ πεποιθότες ὦμεν   me pepoithotes omen     Negative + Active Plural Nominative Masculine Participle + Present Active Subjunctive 1st Person Plural) = that we should not have a strong confidence or reliance upon someone or something.

  • Which raiseth: (ἐγείροντι   egeironti     Present Active Singular Dative Masculine Participle) = causing someone to rise up, conceived of as causing someone to wake up and arise out of bed.

  • Dead: (νεκρούς   nekrous) = people no longer living.

  • What happens to our spirit (the animating force of a person) when we die? See Ecclesiastes 12:7.

 

Questions:

  • Using 1 Corinthians 15:1-58 as a point of departure, discuss the Biblical teaching of the resurrection of the dead.

  • Why is the doctrine of the resurrection of the dead important for all believers?

  • How do you know that you will arise from death after you die?

  • Why can we not rely upon human nature, military might, earthly wisdom, material wealth, or false gods as we go through this life?

  • Where should we place our confidence as we go through this life?

  • Do you or do you not trust God? Discuss.

 

 

 

10 Who delivered us from so great a death, and doth deliver: in whom we trust that he will yet deliver us;

 

  • So great: (τηλικούτου   telikoutou) = so large, so important, or so mighty.

  • Delivered: (ἐρρύσατο   errysato     Aorist Indicative 3rd Person Singular Deponent) = rescued; freed from harm or evil, and in some cases from imprisonment.

  • We trust: (ἠλπίκαμεν   elpikamen     Perfect Active Indicative 1st Person Plural) = we had confidence in, especially as regarding the future?

 

Questions:

  • From what has God delivered you?

  • Why is death considered to be so mighty?

  • How have God’s people been delivered from death?

  • Describe your future state as a member of the family of God.

  • After reading Psalms 20:7, 23:4, 27:3, and Habakkuk 3:17-19, share with your group why we can always trust in God.

  • Why can we have confidence in the promises of God? See Numbers 23:19, Psalm 102:27, and Titus 1:1-2.

  • Why are Jesus Christ’s death, burial, and resurrection important for the people of God?

  • Why does the ministry of Jesus Christ give us comfort in times of trouble?

 

 

11 Ye also helping together by prayer for us, that for the gift bestowed upon us by the means of many persons thanks may be given by many on our behalf. [2]

 

  • Helping together: (συνυπουργούντων   synypourgounton     Present Active 2nd Person Plural Masculine Participle) = collaborating or working jointly on a common enterprise or project.

  • Prayer: (δεήσει   deesei) = divine entreaty; an earnest or urgent request (to God).

  • Many: (πολλῶν   pollon) = a quantifier that can be used with count nouns, amounting to a large but indefinite number.

  • Persons: (προσώπων   prosopon) = human beings and their presence understood by their face.

  • Gift: (χάρισμα   charisma) = a present given as a sign of beneficent or favorable behavior.

  • Thanks may be given: (εὐχαριστηθῇ   eucharistethe     Aorist Passive Subjunctive 3rd Person Singular) = express gratitude or show appreciation to someone.

 

Questions:

  • What kinds of requests or prayers do you normally make to God?

  • Describe your prayer life. How can you change it for the better?

  • List and discuss examples of common enterprises or projects in your faith community.  How did they promote the Kingdom of God and His righteousness?

  • What does this lesson on Comfort in Times of Trouble reveal to us about God?

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. BASIC REFERENCES: See the footnotes as listed and the Web Resources posted at the beginning of this website: www.mosesharrisevangelisticassociation.org.

     

     

     

    http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=I.4640811742463136&pid=1.7&w=194&h=155&c=7&rs=1

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    http://ts4.mm.bing.net/th?id=I.4744255983714507&pid=1.7&w=170&h=149&c=7&rs=1

  2. SUGGESTED SONGS:

     

 

·        Be Thou My Vision

·        Draw Me Nearer

·        Every Promise in the Book Is Mine

·        Every Word of God Is Right; Hallelujah to His Name

·        He Is Lord

·        Holy, Holy, Holy

·        How Great Is our God

·        How Great Thou Art

·        I Go to the Rock

·        I Love Him (2x); Because He First Loved Me; and Purchased My Salvation on Calvary

·        I Trust in God Wherever I May Be

·        I Will Trust in the Lord (3x); Until I Die

·        I’ll Rise Again

·        Let the Spirit Lead You

·        Seek Ye First the Kingdom of God

·        Speak to My Heart

·        Standing on the Promises of God

 

 

·        The Comforter Has Come

·        The Lord Delivered Me One Day (3x); Why Should I Be Bound

·        The Lord Is My Light and My Salvation, Whom Shall I Fear (See Psalm 27:1, 5, 14)

·        Trust and Obey

·        Walk in the Light

·        We Are Our Heavenly Father’s Children

·        What a Fellowship

·        Where Could I God But to the Lord

·        Without God, I Could Do Nothing

·        Worthy; Jesus Is Worthy; He Is Worthy to Be Praised

·        Wounded for Me

·        Yes, Lord

 

 

 

See www.nethymnal.org for additional songs

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

VI.             LESSONS FOR THIS QUARTER: THE PEOPLE OF GOD SET PRIORITIES

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hope and Confidence Come from God

 

June 1

Obey the Lord

Haggai 1:1-11 

June 8

Trust God’s Promises

Haggai 1:12-2:9

June 15

Live Pure Lives

Haggai 2:10-19

June 22

Hope for a New Day

Haggai 2:23; Zechariah 4:1-3, 6-14

 

Living as a Community of Believers

 

June 29

Pursue Unity in Christ

1 Corinthians 1:10-17; 3:4-9

July 6

Glorify God with Your Body

1 Corinthians 6:12-20

July 13

Exercise Freedom with Caution

1 Corinthians 8

July 20

Overcome Temptation

1 Corinthians 10:6-22

July 27

Seek the Good of Others

1 Corinthians 14:13-26

 

 

 

 

Bearing One Another’s Burdens

 

August 3

Comfort in Times of Trouble

2 Corinthians 1:3-11

 

http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?id=H.4740073169487104&w=288&h=184&c=7&rs=1&pid=1.7

 

August 10

Forgiveness and Restoration

2 Corinthians 1:23-2:11

August 17

Treasure in Earthen Vessels

2 Corinthians 4:1-15

August 24

An Appeal for Reconciliation

2 Corinthians 6:1-13; 7:1-4

August 31

Generosity in the Midst of Poverty

2 Corinthians 8:1-14

 

 

 

 

 

 

Have a blessed day in the Lord!!!      

Dr. Harris         

 

 



[1] Dockery, David S. “The Pauline Letters.” Holman Concise Bible Commentary. Ed. David S. Dockery. Nashville, TN: Broadman & Holman Publishers, 1998. 561. Print.

[2] The Holy Bible: King James Version. Electronic Edition of the 1900 Authorized Version. Bellingham, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc., 2009. Print.

 

Seek the Good of Others

1 Corinthians 14:13-26                                                                              Sunday, July 27, 2014

 

 

 

 

http://ts1.mm.bing.net/th?&id=HN.608045757340189643&w=300&h=300&c=0&pid=1.9&rs=0&p=0

Lesson Aims:

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